Change in Symptoms of Depression in Minority Subjects at Risk for CVD : Randomized Controlled Mind-Body Intervention Trials

Publication Type  Conference Paper
Year of Publication  2010
Authors  Nidich, Sanford; Toomey, Mark; Myers, Hector; Rainforth, Maxwell; Grandinetti, Andrew; Salerno, John; Gaylord-King, Carolyn; Schneider, Robert
Conference Name  31st Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
Series Title  Rapid Communications
Pagination  C-038h
Conference Start Date  07/04/2010
Conference Location  Seattle, WA
Abstract  Depression is an important risk factor for the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). For example, research has found that a dose-response effect exists whereby the level of depressive symptoms is linearly associated with development of cardiac events. This presentation reports on the recent analysis of change in depressive symptoms from two National Institute of Health-sponsored randomized controlled mind-body intervention trials with older minority subjects at risk for CVD. Both studies selected minority groups, African American and Native Hawaiian, respectively, who have higher risk for CVD than the majority population. Both studies compared the effects of Transcendental Meditation (TM) to health education (HE), controlling for time and attention, using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CESD) scale. All subjects had at least one major risk factor for CVD and were 55 years or older. The first study conducted in South Central Los Angeles had 80 African American subjects (39 in the TM group and 41 in HE) who completed CESD testing (overall baseline mean CESD = 14.8). Using repeated-measures ANCOVA, covarying for baseline scores, the TM group showed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms compared to HE over 12 months (-6.26 vs. -3.29; p = 0.03). The second study conducted with Native Hawaiian men and women had 53 subjects (26 in the TM group and 27 in HE) who completed CESD testing (overall baseline mean CESD = 11.3). Analysis indicated a significant reduction in depressive symptoms for the TM group (mean = -1.59) compared to HE (+1.36; p = 0.049) over 9 months. Results of these trials indicate that mind-body interventions such as Transcendental Meditation may be effective in reducing depressive symptoms in older minority subjects at risk for CVD. Possible mechanisms are discussed.
Notes  In the media:
http://www.bmedreport.com/archives/11471
URL  http://www.sbm.org/meeting/2010/rapidshandout.pdf